Creating a Stone Lithograph

Lithography was developed in Germany by playwright Alois Senefelder (1771-1834) using limestone as the vehicle to transfer an image onto paper. It was initially used as a commercial printing process, especially for the duplication of scripts and illustrations in books. Artists realized that this medium was also an excellent way to create multiple images. Artists Delacroix and Goya, among many others, mastered the technique. Later, painters such as Picasso, Miro and Chagall embraced lithography to create fine art.

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Printmaking Terminology

Many of the most famous images in art are, in fact, prints. Take for example, one of Durer's most famous works "Apocalypse" which is a woodcut and, therefore, a multiple original. There are three "generalities" of printmaking: intaglio methods, relief methods and planographic methods.

The following information will help to clarify some of the terminology that is associated with print collecting, which may be somewhat intimidating. 

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The Mezzotint

The Mezzotint process was invented by Ludwig Von Seigen in Amsterdam in 1642. It is a laborious and time-consuming technique for creating a print, and primarily for this reason is not widely used today. While the process seemed in danger of disappearing at times, it has enjoyed a resurgence of interest by artists and collectors during the past decade.

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Art Hazelwood: Artist, Impresario, Instigator

Art Hazelwood is an artist with three hats: artist, impresario and instigator. The process of curating art historical shows, organizing artists’ estates, and intense involvement in community and political activism all fit comfortably with the creation of his own artwork. Artists may begin their creative life with noble intentions but often succumb to opportunistic distractions. Hazelwood is one printmaker who has not forsaken his private mission. 

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Chicano Art & Self Help Graphics

While a growing number of exhibitions featuring Chicano art have been staged in museums throughout the United States in recent years, it is an art movement that arose outside the normal art establishment. Chicano art developed hand in hand with protest groups such as the United Farm Workers in California and the La Raza political party in Crystal City, Texas. 

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